It’s easy to fall in love with the lush landscapes of Indonesia. During our travels across Java, Bali, and Flores, we got lost in the islands’ dense palms, towering trees, and larger-than-life waterfalls.  Everywhere we looked, we saw brilliant greens - which isn’t surprising when you learn that almost half of Indonesia’s 17,508 islands is covered in these rainforests (making it one of the largest forests in the world).


However, as we got more connected to this enchanting region and its people, we learned some disheartening news: these beautiful landscapes are at risk of becoming things of the past. Over the last fifty years, 40% of these forests have been destroyed. 40%?!


This number kept us up at night and fueled every design behind the collection. It’s a tricky issue, but here’s the information you need to know…

 

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As the world’s largest exporter of tropical timber, the biggest culprit for Indonesia’s deforestation is the logging industry. The real issue here isn’t the harvesting of the timber – it’s the illegal harvesting of timber. About 75% of wood harvesting in Indonesia is illegal, affecting over 1.5 million acres of forests.


Besides the environmental impact, this illegal harvesting is hurting legitimate timber-harvesting businesses. It is not only reducing the supply of logs available, but also undercutting international prices for wood and wood products, making it tough for these businesses to stay afloat.


When we heard about this issue, we knew we couldn’t single-handedly take on the “black market,” but we wanted to do our part. So we are partnering with businesses who are protecting these resources and also preserving the ancient craft of woodworking itself.


Our partners in Jepara (the woodworking capital of Indonesia) are dedicated to ethical harvesting practices, upholding the SVLK wood standards put in place by the Indonesian government. They also go one step further in conservation efforts, only harvesting trees 20 years of age or older and planting a new tree for every tree used for their production.


These are just small steps towards the greater goal, but we believe it’s the sum of these small decisions to live more consciously that add up to real impact. And with this collection, we’re doing our small part to ensure Indonesia’s precious resources, and its craft traditions live on.


To learn more about this wood workshop, read more here. And to directly support rainforest conservation efforts in Indonesia, we recommend donating to the Rainforest Action Network.

 

 

Sources: Rainforest Action Network, Mongabay, SCS Global Services


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